Turboprop Safety Series | The bully in the left seat | FLY-IN EVENT

pilots-arguing

Pilot bullying leads to crash

06/26/2014 | 06:00PM – 08:00PM

Aviation is a very traditional industry. But our society and its values are changing rapidly. These changes in attitude and lifestyle create a new environment for behavior and character in our narrow cockpits.

Misunderstanding and miscommunication of these changes will create an unsafe base of any decision making between pilot and co-pilot. A bully in the left seat isn’t helpful, can create major tensions and leads to an ineffective teamwork. An ill performing crew is an unsafe factor for operating an aircraft.

We will show you some methods how to channel inflated egos, ever expanding personalities and just plain complicated aviation characters. Our workshop will discuss effective ways to defuse ‘tricky’ situations, improve communication and better intermutual understanding.

Presentation by:

William Pass is a respected training captain for business and owner pilots. In his 40+ year career as a professional aviator he has trained 1000+ pilots internationally and flown in 16 different countries worldwide. His career exposed him to many diverse cultures and values unknown to the ‘westerly world’.

 

Complementary refreshments and snacks will be served.
PPR REQUIRED FOR ALL ACFT TO PARK AT THIS FACILITY: (800) 430-4804
FAASTeam logoThis workshop is in cooperation with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST)


 

$20

non-members

$0 (FREE)

members

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KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR

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KCPM | H2O2 HANGAR | FLY IN: 33.888853, -118.241901
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Parking: 33.888782, -118.241601
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Gate: 33.888622, -118.241011
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Avgas SS: 33.889014, -118.238425
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Small Aircraft Parking: 33.889290, -118.242073
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Large Aircraft Parking: 33.889103, -118.240163
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | WiFi: 33.888880, -118.242223

Turboprop Safety Series | Flying with kids and family – everything but the kitchen sink?!? | FLY-IN EVENT

smart loading of a Pilatus PC12

06/12/2014 | 06:00PM - 08:00PM

Turboprops and high performance piston aircraft are true workhorses. Unlike light jets they can carry a tremendous amount of just plain stuff. “If it fits in the airplane, it will go fly” is a common saying here. Sure, weight and balance isn’t often a big issue with a capable turboprop, but what would be a ‘smart way’ to load up your aerial mini-van?

Going on vacation with the family is quite a task for most owner pilots. But - how to keep the kiddos happy and (most importantly) safe? Your parental counterpart can only do so much. But do you know how much fun flying with your family actually could be?

Our workshop is for aviators and family members - and yes, you can bring your kids and grand-kids for free. In an entertaining way we show you how to improve on your parental skills as an aviator.

  • Regulations you probably never heart of (seat belt, maximum occupancy …);
  • Pressurization is your friend - and will get your kids sleepy;
  • How to ‘smart load’ your ship;
  • Inflight videos are boring;
  • Roles and responsibilities - and some new titles for your crew;

Presentation by:

William Pass (training captain with P3air Inc) was an ambulance pilot, a charter and contractor pilot carting many kids and stuff around. In extend to his 30+ years as an aviator he knows the magic power of blue nitrile gloves, baby wipes and wearing red clown noses

 

Complementary refreshments and snacks will be served.
PPR REQUIRED FOR ALL ACFT TO PARK AT THIS FACILITY: (800) 430-4804
FAASTeam logoThis workshop is in cooperation with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST)


 

$20

non-members

$0 (FREE)

members

REGISTER

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KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR

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KCPM | H2O2 HANGAR | FLY IN: 33.888853, -118.241901
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Parking: 33.888782, -118.241601
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Gate: 33.888622, -118.241011
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Avgas SS: 33.889014, -118.238425
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Small Aircraft Parking: 33.889290, -118.242073
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Large Aircraft Parking: 33.889103, -118.240163
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | WiFi: 33.888880, -118.242223

INTERNATIONAL AVIATION | Operating in Central and South America | FLY-IN EVENT

Flying Amazon

05/29/2014 | 06:00PM - 08:00PM

The ATC management is among the best in the world, but airports tend to be small, surrounded by mountains and generally lacking FBOs.

For aviators in Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and Brazil FBOs are largely nonexistent, so a small industry of handling agents arranges most services.

While ATC is rated as excellent by most pilots, once handed off to towers at airports in mountain valleys, surveillance radar tends to be spotty and precision approach aids are rare - the most common being the DME arch.

Operating in Central and South America today is fairly straightforward, but it has some safety traps. Our workshop will introduce you to a general overview for a safe flight within this continent:

  • Covered countries: Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama and Brazil;
  • Aviation history;
  • Regulation Differences FAA vs. ICAO;
  • Local procedures;
  • FBO and doing business;
  • ...

Presentation by:

William Pass (training captain with P3air Inc) was a contractor pilot in South America and got recently tapped by the Brazilian Air Taxi Association to train their pilots.

Nassui Moura is a native Brazilian, commercial helicopter pilot and CFI.

 

Complementary refreshments and snacks will be served.
PPR REQUIRED FOR ALL ACFT TO PARK AT THIS FACILITY: (800) 430-4804
FAASTeam logoThis workshop is in cooperation with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST)


 

$15

non-members

$0 (FREE)

members

REGISTER

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KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR

loading map - please wait...

KCPM | H2O2 HANGAR | FLY IN: 33.888853, -118.241901
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Parking: 33.888782, -118.241601
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Gate: 33.888622, -118.241011
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Avgas SS: 33.889014, -118.238425
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Small Aircraft Parking: 33.889290, -118.242073
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | Large Aircraft Parking: 33.889103, -118.240163
KCPM | H2O(2) HANGAR | WiFi: 33.888880, -118.242223

Space Weather for Aviators

Aurora Borealis

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P3air Welcome and Business Center | KLAX | FACILITY

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P3air Welcome and Business Center | KLAX | FACILITY 33.954861, -118.396717 Office: Suite 102 Meeting: Suite 101
Space weather for aviators doesn't mean your aircraft gets hit by a meteor. But the sun and its activity has a great impact on our navigation and avionics. Without knowing it we as pilots could get lost in a sun storm.

The significance of space weather lies in its potential impact on man-made technologies on Earth and in space, for example, on satellites and spacecraft, especially radio and telephone communications, electricity power grids, pipelines and on geophysical exploration.

Space weather storms can result in lost or degraded communications, unreliable navigational equipment, flight-critical electronic system problems, and radiation hazards to crew and passengers.

Space weather arises as a result of various dynamic, but relatively short-lived, phenomena produced by the Sun, which are carried in the solar wind and which may interact with the Earth"s magnetosphere. Long-term changes, that is, changes over decades to centuries, also occur in the near-Earth space environment. These changes are due to long period variations in solar magnetic activity and in variations in the strength of the Earth"s magnetic field.

Last year has shown a recent increase in sun activities in an 11 year cycle. These activities have a strong impact on avionics and navigation equipment:

  1. Disruption of GPS;
  2. Disruption of long-distance radio signals;
  3. Ground Induced Current: electrical transmission and ground-based Nav-Aids (VOR, NDB, ...)

 

TurboProp Safety Series | Autopilot & Flight Director: Who’s really flying the plane? | FLY-IN EVENT

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King Air Autopilot Safety CourseWe as turboprop pilots have become so dependent on autopilots that our flying skills, especially instrument skills, have deteriorated to the point that we are an accident ready to happen should the autopilot fail in IMC conditions.

"On every airplane I've ever flown, I tend to use the technology to its full capabilities when it's appropriate",

Sullenberger said. "But looking as far into the future as I can see, every airplane -- no matter how sophisticated -- really needs to be flown, and flown very well, by a human pilot.

Many of us may think of an autopilot being a super device that would make Albert Einstein scratch his head, but the concepts are relatively simple.

This safety workshop will introduce you to:

  • A look at the two primary autopilot design architectures used in turboprops:
    • Position-or Attitude-Based
    • Rate-Based
  • Principle of operation;
  • Normal pilot operation;
  • Most endured autopilot failures;
  • Common Pilot Mistakes;
  • A review the specific differences between the autopilots;
  • Use of an autopilot in emergencies;
  • ...

A 90 minutes multimedia presentation packed with valuable information.

FAASTeam logoThis workshop is in cooperation with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST)

TurboProp Safety Series | Part 91 vs Part 135 – which is safer? | FLY-IN EVENT

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TurboProp Safety Series Part 91 vs 135

For reasons too varied and innumerable to detail, many turboprop operators or owners struggle to afford the cost of owning and operating their airplane. Pressing their finances from one end is the seemingly endless upward movement of costs.

“We still need a turboprop like we always have, but just not as often,” an turboprop owner notes. “We’re not interested in selling, and we don’t need to sell. But since we are needing it less frequently, we figure it can’t hurt to have it generate a little revenue for us.”

Flying under Part 135 imposes greater restrictions on an aircraft and crew than flying under Part 91. But which operation is safer?

Don’t forget that you’ll need a defined maintenance program for the aircraft. The pilots will need to be trained to standards defined by the operations specifications too. If this is all sounding complicated, that’s because it is. In short, how (and under which chapter) you'll own and operate your turboprop will shift costs, depreciation and the focus of your safety.

This safety workshop will explain the difference between a safe Part 91 vs. Part 135 operation:

  • Ownership (fractional, single, corporate)
  • Training requirements;
  • Insurance requirements;
  • FAA requirements;
  • Important maintenance steps;
  • Operational costs;
  • Taxes;
  • Additional endorsements or certificates,
  • ...

A 90 minutes multimedia presentation packed with valuable information.

03/05/2013

06:30 PM - 08:30 PM (18:30 - 20:30)

[ESPRESSO_VENUE id="6"]

Price (online registration): $20

Price for supporting members: FREE (you must be logged in to register)

Price for early birds: Register 14+ days in advance and enjoy a 5% discount (automatically applied at check-out).

Please note: The "Early Bird Discount" requires immediate payment. So please make sure, you complete your registration by paying with the PayPal button!

Limit of 30 participants maximum per course!

This workshop needs a minimum of 6 participants. In case we cannot reach minimum participation we'll notify all participants and refund the course fee 100%.

Complementary soda, water and snacks will be provided.
register now for H2O2 foundation, course 03/05/2013


This workshop is in cooperation with the FAA Safety Team (FAAST)

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